Essay Topics
Types of Essays
Essay Checklist
Word Counter
Readability Score
Essay Rewriter
Procrastination in writing is very common and can result in a substantial loss of pretentiously valuable time. There are many reasons that explain why people procrastinate but these reasons are not always the same from one individual to another. A wide variety of psychological aspects result in procrastination, one of which is anxiety. Everyone exercises procrastination at one point or another in their life, however, most people do not know the cause of this action, or lack thereof. The psychological causes that often outline procrastination include: a deficient feeling of self-worth, culmination of anxiety, and a self-defeating disposition. In addition, people that continually procrastinate seem to withhold a level of conscientiousness which exceeds the average level. Whats this means is people who repeatedly procrastinate generally withhold a trait which compels them to expend or show diligent care and effort. This careful attention to detail in achieving a desired objective often leads to an obsessive desire to avoid error. Procrastinator's sense of reality is "more based on the "dreams and wishes" of perfection or achievement in contrast to a realistic appreciation of their obligations and potential" (Strub 1). There are several psychological causes which result in procrastination. Author David Allen has come up with two considerable psychological causes of procrastination in our everyday lives. These psychological causes are directly affiliated to anxiety, not laziness. The first division constitutes things "too small to worry about, tasks that are an annoying interruption in the flow of things, and for which there are low-impact workarounds; an example might be organizing a messy room" (Procrastination 2). The second division incorporates aspects that are too large to master, tasks that might strike fear into a person, or for which the ending result might possibly inflict an abundant and bountiful repercussion on the life of a person (Procrastination 2). Research has shown that the roots of procrastination are in relation to a specific area of the brain. Information and research has been gathered that proves that the base of procrastination is directly related to the functioning of the individual's prefrontal cortex. The prefrontal cortex is the brain region which is involved in planning complex cognitive behaviors. These behaviors have reference or relation to the mental processes of perception, memory, judgment, and reasoning. The prefrontal cortex is also engaged in the areas of personality expression and in moderating "correct" social behavior. Another executive brain function which is derived from this part of the barin is the ability for a person to control their impulses. "Damage or low activation in this area can reduce an individual's ability to filter out distracting stimuli, ultimately resulting in poorer organization, a loss of attention and increased procrastination" (Strub 1). An example of this is that the prefrontal lobe carries a large role in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, also known as ADHD. Underactivation is remarkably frequent among persons diagnosed with this condition (Strub 1). In some people, the act of procrastination can be quite persistent. In some people procrastination can be a repetitive and constricting disorder. This disorder has the ability to bring about considerable psychological disability and dysfunction. The individuals that are experiencing these ailments are often suffering from the basis of a mental health problem such as Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or depression (Procrastination 2). Perfectionism can easily act as a trigger which enacts and jump-starts procrastination. In accordance with tradition, procrastination has been related to perfectionism, a propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards. "Slaney (1996) found that adaptive perfectionists were less likely to procrastinate than non-perfectionists, while maladaptive perfectionists (people who saw their perfectionism as a problem) had high levels of procrastination (and also of anxiety)" (McGarvey 1). An academic setting proves to mold one of the most perfect environments in which procrastination many arise. Procrastination is said to be widely, or commonly, occurring in settings of or pertaining to a college, academy, school, or other educational institution. In these environments full of activities and events where it is mandatory for students to meet substantial amounts of deadlines for assignments and tests, procrastination generally arises (Gallagher 1). Procrastinators can be divided into two different types, each is equipped with specific details that separate one type from the other. There are two types of procrastinators: the relaxed type and the tense-afraid type. Relaxed procrastinators and tense-afraid procrastinators derive from procrastination itself. The relaxed type of procrastinators view their responsibilities in a negative manor and avoid them by directing their energy into other tasks. The tense-afraid type of procrastinators usually feel as though they are overwhelmed with pressure. The tense-afraid type of procrastinator is also unrealistic about time and uncertain about goals. This type also seems to display many other negative feelings and thoughts (Procrastination 2). Procrastination can arise in many different forms, however, all types of procrastination can be traced back to several general causes. Some students struggle with procrastination due to a lack of time management or study skills, stress, or feeling overwhelmed with their work. Others procrastinate as a result of the individual's strive for perfection. At higher levels of education, conditions are ideal for procrastination to exist. In addition to intangible mental work, higher education levels can be described as having flexible deadlines and often self-defined goals. When excuses are accepted or accommodated, the procrastinators behavior is reinforced, advancing the problem. Procrastination can come into effect as a temporary and infrequent fallacy, or it can play the roll as a continuous infirmity which constantly plagues every-day life.
Essay Writing Checklist
The following guidelines are designed to give students a checklist to use, whether they are revising individually or as part of a peer review team.
Introduction
  • Is the main idea (i.e., the writer's opinion of the story title) stated clearly?
  • Is the introductory paragraph interesting? Does it make the reader want to keep on reading?
Body Paragraph
  • Does each body paragraph have a clear topic sentence that is related to the main idea of the essay?
  • Does each body paragraph include specific information from the text(including quoted evidence from the text, if required by the instructor)that supports the topic sentence?
  • Is there a clear plan for the order of the body paragraphs (i.e., order of importance, chronology in the story, etc.)?
  • Does each body paragraph transition smoothly to the next?
Conclusion
  • Is the main idea of the essay restated in different words?
  • Are the supporting ideas summarized succinctly and clearly?
  • Is the concluding paragraph interesting? Does it leave an impression on the reader?
Overall Essay
  • Is any important material left unsaid?
  • Is any material repetitious and unnecessary?
  • Has the writer tried to incorporate "voice" in the essay so that it has his/her distinctive mark?
  • Are there changes needed in word choice, sentence length and structure, etc.?
  • Are the quotations (if required) properly cited?
  • Has the essay been proofread for spelling, punctuation, grammar, etc.?
  • Does the essay have an interesting and appropriate title?
Procrastination is the Gateway To Failure
Trending Essay Topics
Explore today's trending essay topics:
Reference
Feel free to use content on this page for your website, blog or paper we only ask that you reference content back to us. Use the following code to link this page:
Terms · Privacy · Contact
Essay Topics © 2019

Procrastination Is The Gateway To Failure

Words: 913    Pages: 3    Paragraphs: 9    Sentences: 48    Read Time: 03:19
Highlight Text to add correction. Use an editor to spell check essay.
              Procrastination in writing is very common and can result in a substantial loss of pretentiously valuable time. There are many reasons that explain why people procrastinate but these reasons are not always the same from one individual to another. A wide variety of psychological aspects result in procrastination, one of which is anxiety. Everyone exercises procrastination at one point or another in their life, however, most people do not know the cause of this action, or lack thereof.
             
              The psychological causes that often outline procrastination include: a deficient feeling of self-worth, culmination of anxiety, and a self-defeating disposition. In addition, people that continually procrastinate seem to withhold a level of conscientiousness which exceeds the average level. Whats this means is people who repeatedly procrastinate generally withhold a trait which compels them to expend or show diligent care and effort. This careful attention to detail in achieving a desired objective often leads to an obsessive desire to avoid error. Procrastinator's sense of reality is "more based on the "dreams and wishes" of perfection or achievement in contrast to a realistic appreciation of their obligations and potential" (Strub 1). There are several psychological causes which result in procrastination.
             
              Author David Allen has come up with two considerable psychological causes of procrastination in our everyday lives. These psychological causes are directly affiliated to anxiety, not laziness. The first division constitutes things "too small to worry about, tasks that are an annoying interruption in the flow of things, and for which there are low-impact workarounds; an example might be organizing a messy room" (Procrastination 2). The second division incorporates aspects that are too large to master, tasks that might strike fear into a person, or for which the ending result might possibly inflict an abundant and bountiful repercussion on the life of a person (Procrastination 2). Research has shown that the roots of procrastination are in relation to a specific area of the brain.
             
              Information and research has been gathered that proves that the base of procrastination is directly related to the functioning of the individual's prefrontal cortex. The prefrontal cortex is the brain region which is involved in planning complex cognitive behaviors. These behaviors have reference or relation to the mental processes of perception, memory, judgment, and reasoning. The prefrontal cortex is also engaged in the areas of personality expression and in moderating "correct" social behavior. Another executive brain function which is derived from this part of the barin is the ability for a person to control their impulses. "Damage or low activation in this area can reduce an individual's ability to filter out distracting stimuli, ultimately resulting in poorer organization, a loss of attention and increased procrastination" (Strub 1). An example of this is that the prefrontal lobe carries a large role in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, also known as ADHD. Underactivation is remarkably frequent among persons diagnosed with this condition (Strub 1). In some people, the act of procrastination can be quite persistent.
             
              In some people procrastination can be a repetitive and constricting disorder. This disorder has the ability to bring about considerable psychological disability and dysfunction. The individuals that are experiencing these ailments are often suffering from the basis of a mental health problem such as Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or depression (Procrastination 2). Perfectionism can easily act as a trigger which enacts and jump-starts procrastination.
             
              In accordance with tradition, procrastination has been related to perfectionism, a propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards. "Slaney (1996) found that adaptive perfectionists were less likely to procrastinate than non-perfectionists, while maladaptive perfectionists (people who saw their perfectionism as a problem) had high levels of procrastination (and also of anxiety)" (McGarvey 1). An academic setting proves to mold one of the most perfect environments in which procrastination many arise.
             
              Procrastination is said to be widely, or commonly, occurring in settings of or pertaining to a college, academy, school, or other educational institution. In these environments full of activities and events where it is mandatory for students to meet substantial amounts of deadlines for assignments and tests, procrastination generally arises (Gallagher 1). Procrastinators can be divided into two different types, each is equipped with specific details that separate one type from the other.
             
              There are two types of procrastinators: the relaxed type and the tense-afraid type. Relaxed procrastinators and tense-afraid procrastinators derive from procrastination itself. The relaxed type of procrastinators view their responsibilities in a negative manor and avoid them by directing their energy into other tasks. The tense-afraid type of procrastinators usually feel as though they are overwhelmed with pressure. The tense-afraid type of procrastinator is also unrealistic about time and uncertain about goals. This type also seems to display many other negative feelings and thoughts (Procrastination 2).
             
              Procrastination can arise in many different forms, however, all types of procrastination can be traced back to several general causes. Some students struggle with procrastination due to a lack of time management or study skills, stress, or feeling overwhelmed with their work. Others procrastinate as a result of the individual's strive for perfection. At higher levels of education, conditions are ideal for procrastination to exist. In addition to intangible mental work, higher education levels can be described as having flexible deadlines and often self-defined goals. When excuses are accepted or accommodated, the procrastinators behavior is reinforced, advancing the problem. Procrastination can come into effect as a temporary and infrequent fallacy, or it can play the roll as a continuous infirmity which constantly plagues every-day life.
Procrastination Essay 
McGarvey, Jason A. The Almost Perfect Definition. 3rd ed. Vol. 17. Research/Penn State, 1996.
Procrastination. Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition (1989).

"Procrastination." Wikipedia. 13 June 2007 .
R P Gallagher, S Borg, A Golin and K Kelleher (1992), Journal of College Student Development, 33(4), 301-10.

Strub, R. L. (1989). Frontal lobe syndrome in a patient with bilateral globus pallidus lesions. Archives of Neurology 46, 1024-1027.
Tip: Use our Essay Rewriter to rewrite this essay and remove plagiarism.
Next Procrastination Essay: Procrastination: A Deadly Habit

Add Notes

Have suggestions, comments or ideas? Please share below. Don't forget to tag a friend or classmate.
clear
Formatting Help
Submit
Sitemap